Who is most likely to get sued for malpractice?

Medical Malpractice Lawsuits Highest For Internal Medicine Doctors

Medical malpractice insurance provider The Doctor's Company conducted a study involving the incidences of malpractice claims over one seven-year period. They learned that 58 percent of the claims were related to high-severity injuries and were filed against internal medicine doctors. This was in comparison to 34 percent of malpractice claims that were filed against all physicians.

Internal Medicine Doctors Sued Most

The analysis further indicated that internal medicine doctors are sued most often for three allegations, which account for all but 10 percent of all claims. They are:

  • Faulty or delayed diagnoses was the main cause of malpractice claims for internists. Seventy percent of diagnostic-related claims of malpractice involved high-severity injuries.
  • Complaints about medical treatment. This came in at number two for 32 percent of malpractice claims against internal medicine doctors.
  • Medication-related errors was in third place at 19 percent. It included failing to identify drug interactions or addressing side effects.
Researchers found 84 different kinds of injuries in the claims that they analyzed:
  • Fatalities at 44 percent
  • Infections at 16 percent
  • Malignant conditions at 13 percent
  • Adverse drug reactions at 12 percent

Medical Malpractice Attorney In Rockville

If you have been medically harmed by a care provider's negligence or any other form of malpractice, it can change your life dramatically or even kill you. If you were once the breadwinner for your family but now are unable to work due to your injuries, you will need another source of income and a way to pay those medical bills.

It's only right to hold those responsible for your worsened condition and drastically altered lifestyle. Filing a malpractice claim is one way to seek civil justice in those circumstances.

Source: Becker's Hospital Review, "Internists more likely to face malpractice lawsuits for high-severity injuries than other physicians," Emily Rappleye, accessed Jan. 06, 2017